Podcast Unstoppable Greinke The Greatest Basketball Season Ever And Baseball Brain Data

More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. Hot Takedown Video Excerpt: Brain Data And Baseball Welcome to this week’s episode of Hot Takedown, our podcast where the hot sports takes of the week meet the numbers that prove them right or tear them down. On this week’s show (July 21, 2015), we discuss how Zack Greinke is achieving his scoreless-inning streak, look into whether dominance in women’s basketball is not the same as in the men’s game and welcome SB Nation’s Zach Schonbrun to talk about the impact neuroscience may have on baseball scouting. Plus, our Significant Digit of the week: more people are going to women’s soccer games after the U.S. women won the World Cup.Stream the episode by clicking the play button, or subscribe using one of the podcast clients we’ve linked to above.Below are some links to what we discuss on this week’s show:Zack Greinke chases the records of Dodgers legends Orel Hershiser and Don Drysdale.Fangraphs’ three keys to Greinke’s streak.Is Elena Delle Donne having the best basketball season in history?Zach Schonbrun on mixing neuroscience and baseball.Significant Digit: 34 percent increase in attendance in National Women’s Soccer League games post-World Cup. read more

On the Come Up Euroleague Baller Bobby Brown Practices

Free Agent Bobby Brown is reportedly conducting workouts with the New York Knicks in Las Vegas on Tuesday.Brown, 28, has an over-achieving year in the Euroleague and has been contemplating his return to the NBA. The Knicks are looking for a third point guard to play behind Raymond Felton and Pablo Prigioni and are considering Bown to fill that remaining position.Brown’s stats stayed at around 18.8 on average and 5.3 assists during his time in Italy. Back in January, His 41 point assault against Turkey shows his NBA potential.Previously, Brown played for four NBA teams Sacramento, Minnesota, New Orleans and the Los Angeles Clippers. He spent the past two years in Europe honing his skills.

Nets Paul Pierce Breaks Hand Out 2To4 Weeks

Photo by bleacherreport.com.The Brooklyn Nets who were considered a stacked squad that could challenge the Miami Heat have been a disaster. They have lost 10 of their last 13 games. Rookie coach Jason Kidd was caught and fined for trying a trick to, in essence, create a timeout when his team was out of them. And now, perennial all-star forward Paul Pierce will be sidelined for two-to-four weeks with a broken hand.The team released a statement saying Pierce suffered the injury in a loss at Houston Friday. It happened in the first half and no one knew because Kidd benched Pierce and all the starters for the entire second half of a 19-point defeat.Saturday in a win over Memphis, Pierce, 36, did not play. Pierce joins point guard Deron Williams (ankle), guard Jason Terry (knee) and forward Andrei Kirilenko (back) who are out with injuries.“Injuries are a part of the game,” Kidd said. “You just hope that there are speedy recoveries. And for the guys in that locker room that can play, I believe in each one of those guys and that we can find a way to win until we do get whole.”The Nets (5-12) have lost a total of 37 games due to injury to six players. Kidd has had to use seven different starting lineups. Joe Johnson has been the only player to start every game this season.Pierce was shooting only 36.8 percent and 26.8 percent from behind the 3-point arc while averaging 12.4 points and 4.9 rebounds. He is on pace for career lows in shooting percentages and scoring average in his 16-year career. read more

Bradley Beal Is Finally The Player He Was Meant To Be

2016-174.822.896.3109.560.4 PICK-AND-ROLLOVERALL 2012-132.416.5%5692.351.5% 2015-165.229.58197.954.7 Sources: synergy sports technology, Basketball-Reference 2014-154.326.16692.452.1 2013-142.010.789.792.250.7 2016-174.722.1101109.560.4 2013-144.524.47392.250.7 OFF-SCREENOVERALL Bradley Beal’s pick-and-roll points per play Until this season, Beal ran the pick-and-roll the way most guards in the NBA do. He’d hold the ball, wait for his screen to arrive, and then feel out the space the defense gave him, looking to drive or pass. He has improved this part of his game over the years, but he was never better than about average (and often was far worse than that). That’s mostly because, while he has a good first step, he has never been a strong dribbler; when he can’t go in a straight line to the basket, he’ll often lose his handle and have to reset or will dribble ball off his foot and out of bounds.Having Beal play as though he were a prototypical star shooting guard was not a great use of his talents. So the Wizards have switched things up, getting him open in other ways, away from the ball. After years of spending the greatest portion of his possessions churning out mediocre pick-and-rolls, Beal now gets more shots from running off of screens than from any other play type. And focusing on the off-ball movement has opened up the rest of his game, making him much more effective when he does have the ball. This season’s Wizards commonly start plays with Beal on the wing (or making a run across the baseline to emerge on the opposite wing) and run off a screen that gets him toward the middle of the floor. Because Beal is a threat to shoot off of the screen, the defender has to chase him over it and the screener’s defender has to help discourage a shot. If neither closes him out, Beal can rise up for a shot. If one or both defenders contest, he can use his first step to drive to the rim, which is less congested than it would be if he’d begun the play holding the ball and staring down the defense.That’s a fairly common play type in the NBA, and one that the Cleveland Cavaliers will often run to get Kyle Korver open. But the important thing about these plays isn’t how effective they are — though at 95 points per 100 plays, they’re a perfectly good option for Beal in the half-court — but how much they’ve helped Beal improve those same pick-and-roll plays that had been weighing him and the Wizards down. Last season, Beal scored a career-high 81 points per 100 plays as a pick-and-roll ball handler; this season, he’s taken that to 103 points per 100 plays. That’s due in large part to the space and matchups he’s able to create coming off of screens, which comes from excising a bunch of the slow, pounding, high pick-and-rolls that get him into trouble.Many of this season’s Beal pick-and-rolls are hardly recognizable compared to those of past seasons. In fact, some are more like extensions of Beal’s off-the-screen work than they are traditional pick-and-rolls.Instead of beginning possessions with the defense set, and therefore having to create openings with his dribbling, Beal now often receives the ball after coming around a screen — essentially the play you see above — and then re-engages with the screen for the pick-and-roll going back the other way, or he runs around a second screen set by another Washington big. Instead of immediately exploring the space, however, his first move is now to look for the pull-up 3. It may not sound like much, but the idea is to build Beal’s biggest strength (his jumper) into a primary weapon while minimizing his reliance on things he doesn’t do as well (dribbling and passing).Not every play can be quite that complex. But even when Beal isn’t curling around screens, he’s finding more opportunities to begin the pick-and-roll action early in the shot clock, when the defense is not yet set (which is when he’s looked his best in previous years). Other times, Beal simply needs to run a standard high pick-and-roll while Wall takes a break. Even then, however, it seems like he goes to his jumper more quickly than he used to and looks a little sharper driving into traffic (though he’s still not above occasionally dribbling the ball off of his shin or missing a rolling Marcin Gortat by several feet).These tweaks put several kinds of pressure on the defense. First, it has to guard Beal’s initial run off of the screen, which he’s perfectly happy to use to create a shot. But then, if the defense is successful, Beal can turn his defender back the other way around the same screen to begin the pick-and-roll, where he’s also a threat to pull up. And because all this is happening on a dynamic play instead of in a grinding two-man game, Beal has more clear lanes to the hoop that don’t require any of the fancy moves that get him into trouble, like “changing direction” or “avoiding a defender.”We have to go back to the crates to find someone who both runs a lot of pick-and-rolls and uses them the way Beal does. It turns out that this new-and-improved version of Beal plays a lot like the player he was compared to coming out of college: Ray Allen.Allen didn’t have a partner like Wall to draw attention away from him, but the way he navigated his screens and made defenders come to him would be right at home in 2017’s NBA.For the Wizards to make much noise this spring, a lot of things will have to break their way. The defense will have to snap out of a troubling recent downturn (they’ve allowed 111 points per 100 possessions since the All-Star break, compared to 108 before it), and fellow Zards breakout Otto Porter will need to emerge from a cold spell (he’s shooting 35 percent from three since the break, down from 47 percent before it). But those are more temporary, will-they-or-won’t-they type problems. The biggest change to the Wizards this season is more hardwired than that: Bradley Beal has developed a game that suits his skills, and it’s the game of a perennial All-Star. Even with all the puzzling players floating around the NBA, Bradley Beal has always stood out. He was drafted as a dead-eye shooter, a seemingly ideal foil for John Wall, the Wizards’ supersonic point guard. But despite shooting about as well as can be expected from long distance, and despite possessing many of the tools required of an All-Star guard, Beal has never quite matched his potential.But this season, amid the Washington Wizards’ rise to legitimate Eastern Conference dark horse, Beal has become the version of himself that Washington fans have always hoped would show up.The change looks simple: Beal is attempting more 3-pointers than ever before (he’s up to 7.4 per game this season) and making them as well as he ever has (40.6 percent). This has brought his true shooting percentage up to an elite level (60.4 percent), and it has been crucial to the Wizards posting their best offensive efficiency in his time with the team. But Beal’s transformation from a bundle of unrealized potential into a true partner for Wall is not merely the result of taking more threes. He has also made fundamental changes to his game in search of those shots.Let’s start with the basics: Beal has always been a perfectly good spot-up shooter, but being an NBA star who specializes in shooting is about more than just stroking open jump shots. Just about any NBA-level guard can stand in the corner and hit a decent percentage of the threes that come his way. In the past, the Wizards tried to get Beal to fill out his game by acting like a traditional star guard, running the high pick-and-roll and doing his best Kobe Bryant impression. This didn’t work out so well. 2015-162.715.290.597.954.7 SEASONPLAYS/GAME% OF ALL PLAYSPTS/100 PLAYSPTS/100 PLAYSTRUE SHOOTING % Bradley Beal’s off-screen points per play SEASONPLAYS/GAME% OF ALL PLAYSPTS/100 PLAYSPTS/100 PLAYSTRUE SHOOTING % 2012-132.718.3%86.492.351.5% Sources: synergy sports technology, basketball-reference 2014-152.817.077.492.452.1 read more

The Draw Play Is Dying In The NFL — But It Shouldnt

This is despite the success rate of the play used on first or second down being better than that of all rushes by running backs on those downs.1Third-down draws are often in long-yardage situations in which a team is simply setting up for a punt. According to the ESPN Stats & Information Group, the success rate2Measured by whether the play resulted in positive expected points added. on first- and second-down draws this year is 41.8 percent, compared with 38 percent on all RB runs on those downs. And draws on any down result in longer gains on average (5.29 yards per attempt) than other running back runs (4.35).The Los Angeles Rams called only one draw play all season. (It didn’t work.) The New Orleans Saints waited all the way until Week 10 to run their first draw play of the season — a successful one. That two of the league’s most innovative offensive coaches — Sean McVay and Sean Payton — basically ignore the play seems like a bad harbinger for its survival. But the maestro of the NFL’s best offense, Kansas City’s Andy Reid, is one of the league’s greatest proponents of the play. That makes perfect sense: He’s essentially a Brown disciple, given that his West Coast offense was originally conceived by Bill Walsh when Walsh coached on Brown’s staff with the Bengals. For decades, the draw play has been one of the NFL’s most reliable tricks to fool overeager defensive lineman. The play mimics a pass — in the action of both the quarterback and the offensive line — until the last second, when the ball is handed off to the running back. When it works, the runner can often slice through holes untouched because defenders are busy trying to evade offensive linemen for a sack of the quarterback.The play may seem like the perfect countermeasure to keep a defense honest in the modern NFL. Yet for some reason, the draw play has been all but erased from teams’ playbooks.As the story goes, the draw play was invented in the middle of a game to slow unblockable pass rushers. It quickly became a staple of the modern offense by the sport’s “master innovator” Paul Brown, after a desperate hand-off on a busted passing play ended up working. “You fool one guy with a trap block,” Brown said. “You fool a whole pass rush with a draw play.”Offenses today are more pass-happy than ever before. And defenses have had to respond with more aggressive stunts and blitzes by rushers quicker and more desperate to pressure passers. So what better way to cross them up than by using a draw play? But during the 2018 season, teams ran the play just a little more than once every two games, down from well over two per game just 10 years ago. The Chiefs, who will play Indianapolis in the divisional round this weekend, have run a draw 16 times this year and have had success 10 times. That success rate of 62.5 is by far the best of the 10 teams that have run more than 10 draw plays. The Chargers also have used the draw well, generating 64 rushing yards in 10 attempts, six of which graded as successful.The draw is often thought of as a play of last resort: When teams are faced with virtually hopeless distance to convert a third down, they can use the draw to stop the bleeding before punting. But only 37 third-down draws this past season were in situations when the offense needed at least 7 yards to convert. The vast majority were used on first and second down (256 out of 307 draw plays) and out of the shotgun (253 total draw plays). Of course, the latter makes sense given that the main purpose of the play is to mimic a pass.Reid primarily uses the draw when teams have virtually no defenders dedicated to the run, meaning no more than six defenders “in the box” at or near the line of scrimmage. That was the defense deployed 13 of the 16 times Reid called a draw this season, and the call was successful eight of those times. If defenses continue with this look, a draw could be the perfect call.With the Chiefs offense setting records and NFL coaches looking at it for design and play-calling inspiration, there’s a good chance that teams will soon discover that one of the oldest forms of NFL deception may have even more relevance in the modern game.Check out our latest NFL predictions. read more

Football Freshman have big impact against Nebraska

OSU freshman running back Demario McCall breaks into the open field in the fourth quarter against the Bowling Green Falcons on Sept 3, 2016. OSU won 77-10. Credit: Mason Swires | Assistant Photo EditorYouth has been discussed as the driving force of the Ohio State football team by coaches all season, but the impact of the young players has been mixed at best this season. Team members such as redshirt freshman Mike Weber, who is playing his first season with the Buckeyes, have contributed since the first game of the season. Weber has picked up 842 yards on the ground on 140 attempts, paired with seven touchdowns. These numbers are good enough to put him in the fourth spot in the Big Ten in rushing yards. While his numbers are impressive, the fact that Weber has been playing since Week 1 would cause most fans to expect this kind of production.Against Nebraska, other first-year players stole the show from Weber.Freshman running back Demario McCall – 16 carries for 73 yardsMcCall is the near-opposite of Weber. Standing at just 5-foot-9 and 182 pounds, the North Ridgeville, Ohio native depends on his speed and agility to rack up the yardage. Although McCall’s biggest run of the day was just 10 yards, the freshman took a bulk of the carries late in the game after Weber sustained a shoulder injury, later revealed to be an AC joint sprain by OSU coach Urban Meyer. The dynamic ability of McCall to hide behind blockers along with his relatively small stature and burst around the edge with elite speed is one big reason why OSU recruited the Ohio native, and could see him returning punts in the near future after senior H-back Dontre Wilson continued a trend of muffing the ball on returns.Meyer said McCall has some things to work on before he can be a big factor in the offense or on special teams. “Stronger, better ball security. Just physical strength, experience,” he said. “He’s a little loose with the ball. But his future is nice. He’s a wonderful young man.”The comments were high praise from a guy who doesn’t throw around compliments often.Freshman tight end A.J. Alexander – 3 receptions for 24 yardsAs a statline, this output by Alexander doesn’t seem to be too impressive. But the reserve tight end played well after coming in early in the second quarter. Redshirt junior tight end Marcus Baugh has been a key target of Barrett for the past few weeks, but has been known to drop a few wide-open opportunities.Baugh also seemed to be limping after coming out of the pile after a play in the second half.Alexander performed admirably in the blocking game and showed off his hands with a tight-window catch on a third down. He certainly has the size to play well, and his ability might become clearer if he is used more Saturday.Freshman safety Jordan Fuller – 5 tacklesFive tackles for a first-year player is a nice mark for someone who is mostly a special-teams player. Fuller was all over the field on kick coverage, and came into the game late at safety to replace redshirt sophomore safety Malik Hooker.Fuller is an enormous player, standing at 6-foot-2 and 205 pounds. He as the frame of a linebacker, and can really lay the load when he gets ahold of an opposing player. Meyer praised him on Monday.“Kicking game — Special Teams Player of the Week was Jordan Fuller, who is really coming on as a young freshman and playing well for us,” he said.Fuller is unlikely to pass Hooker for the starting spot, but Saturday’s game served as a testament to the ability of the young safety. read more

No 1 Ohio State stays perfect with win over No 10 Loyola

Redshirt senior middle blocker Driss Guessous takes a set from senior setter Christy Blough in the match against Loyola on Feb. 12. Credit: Aliyyah Jackson | Lantern reporterThe No. 1 Ohio State men’s volleyball team notched another win on its belt on Saturday, this time against conference foe No. 10 Loyola University in St. John Arena.The Buckeyes improve to 8-0 for the season and 4-0 in Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (MIVA) conference play after a sweeping the Loyola Ramblers in straight sets, (25-22, 25-18, 25-19). With the loss, the Rambles drop to 7-4 overall and 3-1 in MIVA. The win for OSU puts it atop of the MIVA standings.“They’re playing with confidence,” OSU coach Pete Hanson said. “Right now, we don’t have any glaring weaknesses. There’s some finer points that we’re trying to smooth over and get better at, but for the most part they’re pretty much clicking on all cylinders right now.”After the Buckeyes gained a 9-3 lead at the start of the first set, the Ramblers battled back to tie the score up at 16. OSU then responded with a three-point run. The score stayed within three for the remainder of the set as the Buckeyes clenched the set 25-22.“I didn’t think we were serving the ball real well early on in that set,” Hanson said. “We had a few more errors than what we had been in the last couple of weeks and that kind fed into their momentum a little bit.”The Buckeyes committed seven service errors, more than twice as many as the Ramblers committed in the first set. Both OSU and Loyola were hitting well as both teams attacked at a rate greater than .400. Senior opposite Miles Johnson led the Buckeyes attacking regime with 7 kills and a .700 hitting percentage. Loyola gained its first lead of the night during a 3-0 run to begin the second set. Another Rambler three-point streak tied the score at 10 all. The Buckeyes then amassed a lead as large as seven points as they won the match 25-18.The Buckeyes were able to neutralize the Loyola’s offensive efforts, holding the Ramblers to a .000 attacking rate. OSU combined for five total blocks in the second set while accumulating nine digs. Third set began with back and forth points for the two teams with the score remaining knotted up at 15. OSU closed out the set on a 10-4 run to win 25-19.Three players on the Buckeye squad swung at a rate greater than .400 in the third set. Senior outside hitter Nicolas Szerszen had the best attacking rate, going .500, while also leading the team in digs with seven.OSU’s win extends its historic winning streak to 36 games, a streak longer than any team in OSU school history that competes in head-to-head competition. The win helps the Buckeyes inch closer to Loyola’s 40-game win streak from the 2014-2015 season and the all-time record of 47 set by UCLA in 1983-1984. “The goal is not to beat the streak,” Szerszen said. “The goal is to get the national championship. That’s the most important thing and then if the streak comes along it’s even better.”The Buckeyes are back in action Friday against conference opponent Quincy University. First serve is at 7 p.m. in St. John Arena. read more

Ohio State running back Brionte Dunn charged with possession of marijuana and

Ohio State freshman running back Bri’onte Dunn has been charged with possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia over the weekend in Alliance, Ohio, according to an Alliance Police Department report obtained by The Lantern. Dunn, 19, was pulled over around 11:08 p.m. Saturday and charged with four different misdemeanors including possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, a tail-light violation and not wearing his seatbelt. According to the police report, Dunn was pulled over near the intersection of E. Broadway Street and Arch Ave. in Alliance after failing to stop behind the white line. Dunn’s car traveled past the crosswalk, nearly ran a red blinking light, and almost struck the observing officer’s patrol car, according to the report. After pulling him over, police found that Dunn and passenger McKensey Cross had a wooden pipe used for smoking marijuana, along with less than 200 grams of marijuana in the pipe, on the seat cushions and on the floor of the vehicle. A small amount of the drug was also found in the driver’s door pocket, according to the police report. As originally reported Sunday night and Monday morning by The Repository in Canton, Dunn was not arrested or taken into jail, despite an earlier report from ESPN radio affiliate WKNR Cleveland that stated otherwise. OSU athletics spokesman Jerry Emig said he was unable to confirm or comment on Dunn’s alleged incident and did not return further requests for comment. Alliance Police department officials did not immediately respond to multiple voicemails from The Lantern for comment regarding the freshman running back. Dunn ran for 5,479 rushing yards in his high school career. He spent his freshman and sophomore seasons at Alliance High School in Alliance, Ohio, before playing his final two years at GlenOak High School outside of Canton. At GlenOak, Dunn was honored as a first-team Division I Ohio All-State selection as a junior and senior. Dunn, who enrolled early at OSU, ran for 21 yards in the Buckeyes’ annual Spring Game on April 21. He and junior running back Carlos Hyde are expected to help share carries in OSU’s season-opener against Miami (Ohio) on Sept. 1 after projected starter senior running back Jordan Hall underwent surgery on his foot after stepping on a piece of glass on June 29. It is uncertain, though, if or how much time Hall could miss as a result of the surgery. Dunn isn’t the first OSU player in trouble with the law since the end of spring practices. On June 2, redshirt senior tight end Jake Stoneburner and redshirt junior offensive lineman Jack Mewhort were arrested for obstructing official business after the two fled police after urinating in public. A day later, first-year coach Urban Meyer suspended Stoneburner and Mewhort from the team before removing them from their athletic scholarships for the summer until certain stipulations between Meyer and the two are successfully met. Similarly, senior linebacker Storm Klein was arrested on charges of domestic violence and abuse on July 6 after allegedly “purposefully” throwing an alleged female victim “against the front door” according to NBC4. Just a day later, Meyer removed Klein from the team citing in a released statement that “his arrest and the seriousness of the allegations warranted Meyer to remove him from the team.”  As of Monday afternoon, it is not known whether Meyer has any disciplinary action against Dunn, nor has the coach released a statement regarding the charges against the freshman.  Dunn did not immediately respond to The Lantern’s request for comment. read more

Mens hockey Ohio State opens NCAA tournament with No 2 overall seed

Ohio State senior forward Nick Schilkey takes a shot on net against Wisconsin in a Big Ten tournament semifinal in Detroit at Joe Louis Arena on March 17. Credit: Courtesy of Ric KruszynskiAfter locking up its first NCAA tournament appearance in eight years, the Ohio State men’s hockey team — the No. 4 seed in the West region — travels to Fargo, North Dakota, to take on the No. 2 overall seed Minnesota-Duluth Bulldogs in the first round.For a third time this season, the Buckeyes will be without senior defenseman Josh Healey, who was suspended for two games by the Big Ten conference Monday as a result of a game misconduct penalty that occurred against Wisconsin on March 17 in the Big Ten tournament.Although Healey is a key piece to his defense, OSU coach Steve Rohlik said the Scarlet and Gray continue to hold a “next man up” mentality in these types of situations. Despite their lack of experience, Rohlik said that younger defensemen, such as freshmen Gordi Meyer and Matt Miller, will be vital in the absence of his skillful senior on the backline.“These guys have played all year with us. They know what we want to do and how we want to play,” Rohlik said. “At the end of the day, these two guys have played a lot of minutes for us this year, and I have all the confidence in the world that they’re going to go up there and do their job.”With a poised Healey out of the lineup, senior forward and captain Nick Schilkey emphasized that the Buckeye forwards will have to occasionally backtrack to help out the OSU backline — and echoed his coach’s belief in the younger members of the Scarlet and Gray to step up when needed on defense against the Bulldogs’ impressive offense.“I think the biggest thing is making sure that us as forwards, we focus on getting back and helping (the defense) out,” Schilkey said. “It’s a good opportunity for some other (defensemen) to step up, too, and I think some guys are going to relish in that opportunity.”Minnesota-Duluth enters this matchup behind a strong core that has made the NCAA tournament for a third-straight year, and ranks as the No. 8 scoring offense in the nation at more than 3.42 goals per game. Senior winger Alex Iafallo and sophomore forward Adam Johnson have each registered 45 and 36 points this season, respectively.Additionally, the Bulldogs’ defense also ranks among the best in the nation at No. 11 in the USCHO.com statistics, mainly behind the play of freshman goaltender Hunter Miska and sophomore defenseman Neal Pionk — who Rohlik calls a “difference maker” on the ice.Despite Minnesota-Duluth’s overall depth and abilities in all facets of the game, Rohlik said his team isn’t looking to make any changes to its game plan, and is trying to stick to what propelled the Buckeyes to their first 20-win season since 2009.“You wouldn’t say they’ve got a lot of weaknesses looking at them, but they’re as beatable as anybody else,” Rohlik said. “They’ve got to go out and play the game, and we’ve got to go out and play the game for 60 minutes — and we’re going to go empty the tanks and go in there with confidence.”With this being the first NCAA tournament appearance for the players on his roster, and possibly the final game in an OSU jersey for his seven seniors, Rohlik said his biggest message to his team this week has been to appreciate what they have accomplished this season and what they have done for the program during their time in Columbus. Ultimately, however, the collective goal of the Buckeyes is to survive and advance.“We’re not satisfied with just going up there and being a part of it, but it’s also a big reason why you work this hard to have this experience and enjoy it,” Rohlik said. “We’re going to enjoy it, but to enjoy it, you’ve got to go up there and try to win hockey games.”Puck drop  for the first round Friday night is set for 6:30 p.m at Scheels Arena. read more

Football JT Barrett named Big Ten Quarterback of the Year

Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) looks to throw a pass in the first quarter of the game against Michigan on Nov. 25 in Ann Arbor. Ohio State won 31-20. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorIn J.T. Barrett’s final season at Ohio State, the redshirt senior added yet another title to his cluttered resume Thursday when the Big Ten announced he had been named the Big Ten Griese-Brees Quarterback of the Year.It is the third time in Barrett’s four-year career that he was honored with the recognition. He won the award last season and in his redshirt freshman season at quarterback during the 2014 campaign. Barrett is the first three-time captain in program history, and is the holder of 24 Ohio State and Big Ten records.This season, Barrett has enjoyed another strong campaign, completing 217-of-328 passes (66.2 percent) for 2,728 yards. He also has 33 touchdown passes and only seven interceptions. The dual-threat quarterback has also continued to show his mobility this season, rushing 130 times for 672 yards and scoring nine times. read more