New Brunswicks fracking moratorium will only be lifted once 5 conditions met

FREDERICTON — The New Brunswick government is introducing a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing that the premier says won’t be lifted until five conditions are met.Those conditions include a process to consult with First Nations, a plan for wastewater disposal and credible information about the impacts fracking has on health, water and the environment, Brian Gallant said Thursday.“We have been clear from Day One that we will impose a moratorium until risks to the environment, health and water are understood,” Gallant told a news conference in Fredericton.“We believe these conditions to be very reasonable.Gallant said he also wants the development of a royalty structure and a “social licence” ensuring that the public accepts fracking before the moratorium would be removed, though he acknowledged that has yet to be defined.Energy East refinery’s benefits questioned in new reportHe said his government supports job creation but added that it needs to be done in a diversified and sustainable way.“We’re not interested in putting all of our eggs in a single basket,” he said.A number of companies are currently exploring for shale gas in the province and Corridor Resources recently fracked wells in the Penobsquis area that are used to supply gas to the nearby Potash Corp. mine.Gallant said such operations would be allowed to continue under the legislation, as long as they don’t rely on fracking.“We’ll certainly also always listen to businesses that may have concerns and try to mitigate some of the impacts if they believe (them) to be negative on their operations,” he said.Nova Scotia, Quebec and Newfoundland and Labrador have also passed moratoriums on fracking, though they vary in scope. read more

JFK diary written in postWWII Europe sells for 718000

JFK diary written in post-WWII Europe sells for $718,000 FILE – This undated file photo provided by RR Auction shows a portion of a diary written in 1945 by a young John F. Kennedy during his brief stint as a journalist after World War II. The diary, in which he reflected on Hitler and the weakness of the United Nations, sold for more than $700,000 Wednesday, April 26, 2017, according to the auction house. (Sarina Carlos/RR Auction via AP, File) by Crystal Hill, The Associated Press Posted Apr 25, 2017 10:54 pm MDT Last Updated Apr 26, 2017 at 6:00 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email BOSTON – A diary kept by a young John F. Kennedy during his brief stint as a journalist after World War II in which he reflected on Hitler and the weakness of the United Nations sold for more than $700,000 on Wednesday.Boston-based RR Auction said the diary sold for $718,750, far exceeding the pre-sale estimate of $200,000. Joseph Alsop, a JFK collector from Beverly, outbid one other live and six telephone bidders in a packed house for the 61-page diary. Alsop, 71, plans to add it to his personal collection, auction officials said.The diary is mostly typed but includes 12 handwritten pages. It was written in 1945 when the 28-year-old Kennedy was a correspondent for Hearst newspapers and travelled through a devastated Europe.Executive Vice-President Bobby Livingston said the auction was thrilling, with bidders from around the country vying for the personal observations of the man who’d become president.“My expectations were exceeded, but I’m not surprised because it’s such a significant and historic manuscript,” Livingston said.The diary’s new owner is the nephew of Joseph Alsop V and the son of Stewart Alsop, two brothers and influential columnists during the Kennedy presidency.“I’m happy to own it,” said Alsop, who was 16 when he met Kennedy at his uncle’s home in 1960. “I think it’s a wonderful object and a tribute to Kennedy’s development as an individual. He displays a remarkable degree of insight into world affairs at a very young age.”Kennedy gave the diary to Deirdre Henderson, a research assistant in his campaign office in the late 1950s who now lives in the Boston area.In the diary, Kennedy reflected on his time in a gutted Berlin and even saw Hitler’s bunker, speculating that he was not killed. He wrote that Hitler “had in him the stuff of which legends are made.” But Henderson said in an interview last month that should not be misinterpreted as sympathy for the German dictator.“He said that in reference to the mystery surrounding him and not the evil he represented,” Henderson said.Kennedy expressed doubt about the effectiveness of the fledgling United Nations, questioning whether it “will prove effective in the sense of its elaborate mechanics being frequently employed or vitally decisive in deterring war or peace.”Henderson said she put the diary up for sale so it can be properly preserved, and she’s confident the winning bidder will respect her wish. She said she wanted the sale to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Kennedy’s birth this year.“I’m more than pleased with the outcome,” Henderson said. “I think it was the right price at the right time.”Kennedy, the 35th U.S. president, served from January 1961 until he was assassinated in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.___This story has been corrected to show the diary’s new owner is Stewart Alsop’s son, not nephew. read more

Nine Ukraine soldiers killed by Russian separatists

first_imgAt least nine Ukrainian soldiers were killed in attacks by pro-Russian separatists in the east overnight, the Kiev defence ministry has said.Eight were killed and another 17 wounded when rebels opened fire on a military checkpoint near the town of Volnovaha in the Donetsk region, ministry spokesman Bogdan Senk said.Heavily armed “terrorists” carried out the attack, the ministry said.Another soldier was killed and two injured in clashes in the neighbouring Lugansk region.It’s the the deadliest day for the military in weeks of fighting between Russian separatists and Ukrainian security forces in the area.Includes reporting from AFP.Read: Russian diplomat for talks over Charles’ Putin-Nazi commentlast_img