Dylan Hartley – Northampton and England

first_imgTAGS: Northampton Saints DH: Megan Fox, she’s pretty hot. James Haskell would be bad – he’d use up all the oxygen!RW: What couldn’t you live without?DH: My family. I came all the way from New Zealand to live in this country and I still live with my brother.RW: If you could have one superpower, what would it be and why?DH: To fly, so I could reduce the flight time to New Zealand. Or stretch time, so I could stay on the pitch longer than 65 minutes for England!RW: Any bad habits?DH: I bite my nails before a game, but never at any other time. It must be a nervous thing.RW: What’s your dream car?DH: A Jaguar XKR. I’ve just ordered one, but it’ll probably come just as I go on holiday so I won’t get to drive it! My brother heads the list of people who want to borrow it, but I’m not sure that’s going to happen.RW: Who’s your perfect woman?DH: My mum. I only see her for a few weeks a year, so when I go home she really looks after me.RW: How would you like to be remembered?DH: As a loyal rugby player. Northampton means a lot to me and I’m proud to be captain of such a great club.RW: Who’s your best and worst room-mate?DH: James Haskell, for both of those. There’s never a dull moment with James. He’s always on the phone, doing deals, and there are always dramas in his life! But he’s great, and I’d never swap him for sitting there and getting lonely on my own.Check out his profile for England Learn more about Dylan’s teammates at Northampton…Paul Diggin…And also at England…Danny Care LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Dylan Hartley striking a poseStill in his early twenties, ‘Chunk’ holds the title of the youngest Premiership captain, a big responsibilty for the Northampton Saints and England hooker who took some time out to chat to Rugby World about gaming, travelling anywhere hot and how he couldnt be any happier being surrounded by his family. RUGBY WORLD: How often do you play computer games?DYLAN HARTLEY: Every day. I play Call of Duty on-line.RW: Do you play against team-mates?DH: Yeah. Being a sportsman, it’s kinda compulsory to have rest time, so what better way than to put your feet up and play Xbox LIVE?!RW: Does it get quite competitive?DH: Yeah, there’s a bit of banter flying around the changing rooms. At Northampton we’ve got about ten people who’ll play on-line together. Courtney Lawes, Neil Best, Roger Wilson, Mark Hopley… Courtney is on there quite a bit.RW: What’s the funniest thing you’ve seen on the pitch?DH: Last year, London Irish away on St Patrick’s Day, a streaker ran on the field. Usually streakers are fat, hairy men, but this was a good-looking blonde lady. There’s a photo of the teams, who were supposed to be going down for a scrum, with this lady running through the middle – their faces are funny!RW: Who are the jokers in the Saints squad?DH: Chris Ashton is one hell of a character. With Xbox LIVE you have a headset so you can talk to other players, and sometimes he’ll come round to my house and just sit on the mic bantering other players in his northern accent!RW: Do you have any nicknames?DH: Chunk, from The Goonies. The boys always ask me to do the Truffle Shuffle but I’m not going to do that for you! And just Dyl really.RW: If your house was on fire, what three things would you save?DH: I live with my brother, his girlfriend and their baby, so there’s three things. But if they weren’t there probably just the usual – car keys, phone and wallet.New Zealand, Superpowers and Room-mates…RW: Any phobias?DH: I don’t like snakes, or deep water. But I like swimming so I don’t know how that works.RW: Any bugbears?DH: Bad manners, and I hate texting because I’ve got fat fingers.RW: What’s your idea of a dream holiday?DH: Each year I tend to go back to New Zealand to see my parents. But I spend ten months in the English winter, and then go back to New Zealand and it’s cold there. So anywhere hot really; I’ve been to Dubai and Thailand before.RW: Who’d you like to be stuck in a lift with? Mark Cueto Lee Mearslast_img read more

Montpellier have Falcons in their sights

first_img“We will have to be strong, compete physically and dominate in the scrum in particular. In Round 2 we struggled to gain territory in the earlier stages of the game then we managed to find solutions and find the breaks.“My best memory so far in the Amlin Challenge Cup was last year in Round 1 when we went to Worcester with a team consisting mostly of young players and came away with a win. We didn’t expect to succeed but we played with all our hearts and managed to impose our game.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Montpellier captain Vassili Bost challenges Exeter’s Andrew HigginsMontpellier remain on course for Amlin Challenge Cup quarter-final qualification as Pool 3 winners – and victory at Newcastle Falcons on Friday night would take them a giant step closer to a place in the last eight in April.“We aimed at qualification from the start of the season and at present we are still within reach of that goal,” said back row forward and captain Vassili Bost. “However, we have two complicated games left in the Pool phases against two big English squads so we know it will be tough.“Exeter Chiefs, despite being newly promoted, have shown that they are up there with the rest of the English squads and are very physical up front. They beat Newcastle twice in three encounters this season – including a big win in Round 3 of the Amlin Challenge Cup – and they only lost to them by two points in Round 4 so we cannot take them lightly.“The level in this competition has intensified in the last few years, especially the last two seasons with the introduction of the new quarter-final qualification format. That means the teams have to go up one gear to secure first place in their respective Pools to make it to the knock-out stages.“There is hardly any room for error now but it’s great to see some Heineken Cup teams taking part in the quarter-finals. It makes the tournament more attractive for us because you get to compete against big squads. “The Heineken Cup is also one of the long sought after goals we set ourselves at Montpellier and since the club has never played in that competition it remains a massive ambition.“We may finally be able to get there, either by qualifying through the Amlin Challenge Cup or through our Top 14 ranking, which seems more likely seeing that we currently stand in third position. We take one game at a time and we’ll see where that takes us.“Now we start our two remaining Amlin Challenge Cup rounds with a trip to Newcastle. We will approach that game very cautiously because even though we beat them earlier in the season that does not mean we will repeat that performance and this time we are away from home. We will try to impose our game and we will keep in mind that we need to secure our first position in the table. TAGS: Newcastle Falcons last_img read more

Step-By-Step Guide: How to Offload

first_imgWould you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Step 3: Offload with two hands, if possible, making it easier for your team-mate to catchStep 4: The support runner cuts in late to take the offload in the space left by the defenderThis article appeared in the July 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad.center_img OFFLOADING IS not an easy skill to master, but get it right and your team will score some sensational tries. Never throw a wild pass or give the ball away cheaply in contact, but always look to offload, to keep the attack alive, if possible, in preference to going to ground.Attacking players should always run with the ball in two hands. Tucking it under your arm automatically tells a defender that you aren’t going to pass, making it much easier for him to tackle you!So keep defenders guessing. Only transfer the ball into the hand furthest away from the tackler at the last moment, using quick feet and a strong leg drive to try and get past your opponent.Don’t go into contact looking to offload the ball. Try to beat your man, but offload to a support runner if you’re held – and if it’s on. Otherwise, go to ground on your terms and set up a ruck.Don’t look to throw a long pass out of contact where a team- mate is likely to be marked by a defender. A good support runner should cut in late on an angled run and take the offload in the space vacated by the tackler.Try to offload with two hands, floating it onto what I always describe as an invisible shelf, making it as easy as possible for the support runner to catch.Step 1: Run straight at the defender, carrying the ball in two hands to keep him guessingStep 2: Step off  one foot to get round the defender, transferring the ball away from his reachlast_img read more

England tour: Barbarians side built with entertainment in mind

first_imgEveryone – Lions included – should just enjoy this match for what it is: a pleasurable and accessible start to the international season.Let the games begin.Kick off at 1pm, Twickenham, Sunday May 26.TeamsEngland:Mike Brown; Christian Wade, Jonathan Joseph, Billy Twelvetrees, Marland Yarde; Freddie Burns, Richard Wigglesworth; Ben Morgan, Matt Kvesic, Tom Johnson; Dave Attwood, Joe Launchbury; David Wilson, Rob Webber (c), Alex CorbisieroSubs: David Paice, Joe Marler, Henry Thomas, Kearnan Myall, Billy Vunipola, Haydn Thomas, Jonny May, Kyle EastmondBarbarians:Elliot Daly (Wasps, UNCAPPED); Takudzwa Ngwenya (Biarritz, USA), Casey Laulala (Munster, New Zealand), Mike Tindall (c) (Gloucester, England), Timoci Nagusa (Montpellier, Fiji), James Hook (Perpignan, Wales), Dwayne Peel (Sale Sharks, Wales), Andrea Lo Cicero (Racing Metro, Italy), Matthew Rees (Scarlets, Wales), James Johnston (Harlequins, Samoa), Jim Hamilton (Gloucester, Scotland), Marco Wentzel (Wasps, South Africa), Alessandro Zanni (Treviso, Italy), Jonathan Poff (Wasps, UNCAPPED), Imanol Harinordoquy (Biarritz, France) Masterminds: Skipper Tindall and Dai Young will tell their Baabaa pals to remove the shackles for the England gameBy Alan DymockBEFORE THE compression socks are rolled on and the squad head towards a long-haul Monday flight to Hong Kong and the British and Irish Lions, the Barbarians have the small task of facing England at Twickenham.Great expectations: Wasps’ Christian WadeCoach Dai Young has selected a side to match the plucky, inexperienced England team and while they have opted for experience and caps throughout, they have also picked players capable of throwing the ball around in typical Baabaa fashion. With youth and excitement against wily old boys looking for a good time, entertainment is almost guaranteed.James Hook starts at fly-half opposite Freddie Burns. Timoci Nagusa is opposite Christian Wade and Takudzwa Ngwenya stands in front of Marland Yarde on the wings. Ben Morgan trots out against Imanol Harinordoquy. Casey Laulala marks Jonathan Joseph. Alex Corbisiero props against James Johnston.Everywhere you look there is youth and explosion against guile and some of the most impressive muscle memory in the game.As rugby goes, this match is almost an antidote to the serious affairs before it and after it. The Baabaas game on Sunday is played on the same pitch where, only 24 hours earlier, Leicester Tigers and Northampton Saints were trying to bludgeon each other. It comes just a week before the Lions play for the first time, facing a Barbarian XV with almost certainly more potential to play winning rugby.Wanting to “be counted”: Matthew ReesThat is not to say that the Barbarians team for the Twickenham game is deliberately weak, it is just that it is one pulled together to play a junior international side, while the highlight of the Baabaa summer will be the big one in Hong Kong. Some players will play in both games for the Barbarians, but not all of them will start.Matthew Rees told the press today that although facing England was big, it was all about the Lions for him and some of his chums.“There’s a few Welsh players here… who have probably missed out on the Lions tour,” he said.”We’ve got to hold our hands up and be counted, and there’s no better way than playing the Lions in Hong Kong.”Sunday will be a fun bit of preparation, though it may not be worthwhile for Warren Gatland and his boys to analyze it too much. There is this game and then suddenly Joe Rokocoko, Kahn Fotuali’I, B J Botha, Martin Castrogiovanni, Samu Manoa,
Francois Louw and
 Sergio Parisse come in for the Baabaas and others step up from the bench. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS CARDIFF, WALES – MARCH 12: Wales hooker Matthew Rees stretches during a Wales training session at the Vale on March 12, 2013 in Cardiff, Wales. (Photo by Harry Engels/Getty Images) Subs: Schalk Brits (Saracens, South Africa), Duncan Jones (Ospreys, Wales), Paul James (Bath, Wales), Dean Mumm (Exeter, Australia), Sam Jones (Wasps, UNCAPPED), Dimitri Yachvili (Biarritz, France), Nick Evans (Harlequins, New Zealand), Rowan Varty (DeA Tigers, Hong Kong)last_img read more

Episcopales y metodistas unidos contra el paludismo

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 29, 2012 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopales y metodistas unidos contra el paludismo Voluntarios de NetsforLife® se valen del teatro como un modo de comunicar la importancia de usar mosquiteros tratados con insecticidas para evitar contraer el paludismo. Aquí una de tales obras es parte de una reunión comunitaria, conocida como un durbar, en Apodabogo, en la Diócesis Anglicana de Tamale en el norte de Ghana. Foto de ENS/ Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service] El programa NetsforLife® de Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales Episcopal y el Comité de Ayuda Metodista Unido (UMCOR, por su sigla en inglés) anunciaron el 23 de mayo que habían creado una alianza para prevenir y controlar el paludismo en el África subsahariana.El nuevo empeño hará posible llegar a los africanos en 21 países donde el paludismo es endémico, dijeron ambas agrupaciones en un comunicado de prensa conjunto.“El objetivo de esta alianza es disminuir la incidencia de la enfermedad y de la muerte debido al paludismo, robustecer la capacidad de las organizaciones locales para movilizar a sus comunidades contra esta enfermedad y fortalecer las conexiones entre denominaciones religiosas, sectores y países a fin de compartir conocimientos y perfeccionar mejores métodos”, dijo Rob Radtke en el comunicado de prensa, presidente de Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales.“La solidez de nuestro programa NetsforLife® y de UMCOR es que ambos trabajamos con iglesias y otras instituciones de masas para salvar las deficiencias en la cobertura de servicios de salud -principalmente en zonas rurales- y crear soluciones que se ajusten al contexto y a los retos de cada localidad”.NetsforLife® fomenta una “cultura de mosquitero” en las comunidades, al combinar la distribución de mosquiteros de larga duración tratados con insecticidas con organización e instrucción comunitarias acerca de la prevención del paludismo, así como el uso adecuado del mosquitero y su mantenimiento. Gran parte del trabajo, incluida la permanente supervisión y evaluación del uso del mosquitero, lo realizan voluntarios locales entrenados.Desde 2006, cuando Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales comenzó a administrar NetsforLife®, el programa se ha expandido de ocho a 17 países, ha distribuido más de 8,5 millones de mosquiteros, ha adiestrado a cerca de 74.000 agentes voluntarios para el control del paludismo y ha llegado a más de 25 millones de africanos, según estadísticas que pueden encontrarse aquí. Entre 2006 y fines de 2011, los mosquiteros han salvado las vidas de más de 100.000 niños menores de cinco años y han reducido la tasa total de muertes relacionadas con el paludismo en un 45 por ciento en las comunidades donde NetsforLife® está funcionando, dio a conocer el programa aquí en abril.La alianza entre episcopales y metodistas comenzó informalmente en 2010 y ha sido particularmente efectiva en zonas de la República Democrática del Congo y en Sierra Leona, según el comunicado de prensa.Shannon Trilli, director de Iniciativa de Salud Mundial de UMCOR, dijo que “queda todavía mucho por hacer en nuestra labor de prevención del paludismo, especialmente a nivel comunitario y de aldea. Pero al mancomunar los recursos y experiencia de UMCOR, en el desarrollo de infraestructura y comunicaciones sanitarias, a la programación, supervisión y enfoque evaluativo de NetsforLife®, podemos fortalecer y profundizar nuestro impacto”.En la República Democrática del Congo, la relación dio lugar a la exitosa movilización de las comunidades a través de un evento público auspiciado por la cantante sudafricana Yvonne Chaka Chaka. Según el comunicado de prensa, al acto siguió una campaña de distribución de puerta en puerta de 30.000 mosquiteros y la fundación de CORESA, una innovadora coalición de carácter religioso para promover la salud.NetsforLife® y UMCOR asociaron su labor con la Campaña Nacional Integrada de Salud Materna e Infantil en Sierra Leona, donde se distribuyeron aproximadamente 400.000 mosquiteros y se adiestraron 3.800 voluntarios. Orientado a lograr la cobertura universal de la población en riesgo de contraer paludismo, el proyecto fue la mayor campaña sanitaria en la historia del país, según decía también el comunicado.Las dos organizaciones trabajarán juntas y en alianza con otras en Angola, Botsuana, Burundi, Costa de Marfil, Ghana, Guinea, Kenia, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Sudán, Sudán del Sur, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia y Zimbabue, así como seguirán la labor emprendida en la República Democrática del Congo y en Sierra Leona.La campaña episcopal está parcialmente financiada por el Fondo de Inspiración de NetsforLife®, que tiene por objetivo concienciar, comprometer y unir a los episcopales en apoyo a los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio y en el combate al paludismo. También espera llegar a recaudar $5 millones para diciembre a fin de ayudar a NetsforLife® a continuar su labor.El fondo se origina en la 75ª. reunión de la Convención General en 2006, cuando la Iglesia Episcopal respaldó lo que se ha llegado a conocer como el Fondo Inspiracional de los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio. En tres años ha recaudado más de $3,2 millones. En 2009, la Iglesia renovó ese apoyo al respaldar el Fondo Inspiracional de NetsforLife® y contribuir con 0,7% del presupuesto trienal (alrededor de $800.000) como fondo inicial para ese empeño.Entre los aliados actuales del programa NetsforLife®, se incluyen la Fundación ExxonMobil, el Standard Chartered Bank, la Fundación Coca-Cola África, la Fundación Starr International y la Fundación J.C. Flowers.El proyecto Imagínese un Mundo sin Paludismo de la Iglesia Metodista Unida espera eliminar la muerte y el sufrimiento causado por el paludismo en África para 2015. Según el comunicado, la IMU es socia fundadora de la campaña Nada Sino Mosquiteros, de la Fundación de Naciones Unidas, que funciona a través de Imagínese un Mundo sin Paludismo y que se dedica a mejorar la infraestructura sanitaria y a capacitar a las comunidades para una victoria sostenida sobre la enfermedad.El paludismo solía matar cerca de un millón de personas cada año -la mayoría de ellas niños menores de cinco años. La Organización Mundial de la Salud calcula que el año pasado murieron 655.000 personas, una reducción que se la acreditan a las campañas para combatir la enfermedad. Dormir debajo de un mosquitero tratado con insecticida es una manera sencilla y altamente eficaz de reducir la incidencia de paludismo. Sin embargo, no resulta fácil convencer a las personas de dormir con mosquiteros.NetsforLife® instruye a las personas acerca del paludismo y el por qué dormir debajo de un mosquitero tratado con insecticida es fundamental para evitar contraer la enfermedad. Alienta a los que reciben los mosquiteros a que los usen, en parte ayudándoles a entender que el descenso del número de veces que los miembros de su familia se han enfermado de paludismo está relacionado al hecho de dormir con mosquiteros.Radtke dijo al Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia en 2011 que “NetsforLife® ha cambiado la manera de pensar de toda la comunidad sanitaria mundial respecto al modo de erradicar el paludismo”.El cambio se produce porque las estadísticas de la agencia muestran que sus esfuerzos han dado lugar a un uso mayor y más sostenido del mosquitero. La comunidad sanitaria mundial considera el uso sostenido de mosquiteros como “el santo grial” de la prevención del paludismo, afirmó él.La cobertura de Episcopal News Service de la labor de NetsforLife® en Ghana (en inglés) puede encontrarse aquí, con un informe videográfico que lo acompaña aquí.— La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri.En inglés: http://bit.ly/LEpEpF Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Featured Eventslast_img read more

Consultative Council ready to stand by religious minorities

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Advocacy Peace & Justice, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion, Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Episcopal News Service — Auckland, New Zealand] The Anglican Consultative Council apparently will go on record at its Oct. 27-Nov. 7 meeting here as deploring persecution of religious minorities in Pakistan.On Nov. 3 (local time) the council discussed a resolution that, in its proposed form, says in part that Pakistan’s blasphemy laws “while protecting Islam and the Prophet, are vaguely formulated and are increasingly being arbitrarily enforced by the police and judiciary in a way which amounts to harassment and persecution.”The resolution calls for repeal of the laws and that the government take steps to “prevent their unjust application” pending that repeal. It also asks the government to protect the life and property of religious minorities and immediately stop abductions, forced conversions and forced marriages.While the members were prepared to pass the resolution on Nov. 3, they decided to send it back to the resolutions committee to perfect language that would call on each communion province to contact directly their government’s diplomatic agencies and representatives of the Pakistani government in their countries in order to express their concerns.“I think you are assured of a positive outcome of this resolution,” ACC Chair and Diocese of Southern Malawi Bishop James Tengatenga told Archbishop Samuel Azariah, moderator of the Church of Pakistan and bishop of Raiwind, as the council loudly applauded.Azariah had moved the resolution; saying he did so standing before the council “in pain and in agony.”He noted that when Pakistan was created there was a pledge of equal rights for all religious minorities but “today the religious minorities in Pakistan are facing serious threats to their existence.”“It is not only an issue of their human rights; it is an issue of existence for us in our context,” Azariah said.Archbishop Ikechi Nwachukwu Nwosu of the Province of Aba, Church in Nigeria, said most of the words of the resolution could apply to Christians in the northern part of his country. Nwosu and the other Nigerian ACC members recently called for prayers, fasting and other support of religious minorities in that country.Archbishop Thabo Makgoba of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa urged passage of the resolution saying that “part of our communion is hurting and if that part is hurting, we are all hurting.”The resolution, he said, “requires us in a tangible way to express what it is to be communion.”Diocese of Ceylon Bishop Dhiloraj Canagasabey said “hundreds of thousands of Pakistanis” are coming to Sri Lanka because they have been tortured, had their homes burned down or they have escaped abduction attempts.“This needs to stop,” the bishop said.“Important organizations” of the world, including the ACC, must “take this seriously and show the solidarity,” he said.The Ven. Turi Hollis, ACC member from the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia, said his fellow citizens “are fortunate in this county where we don’t live under the threat of terrorism as much as [some Anglicans face] in other parts of the communion”“We still follow and sorrow and grieve with you as these things happen. We don’t always know what practical things we can do to show our support,” he said, adding that the resolution was at least a way of showing solidarity.Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams suggested that the members ought to agree that in addition to standing by religious minorities, “we’re [also] expressing support for all those elements in civil society in Pakistan who are struggling for some kind of open democratic polity,” especially “those of the legal world who are increasingly going public with their discontent.”“It think that it is very important that activists and advocates should hear that we are supporting them as well,” he said.Williams also said he had heard some members suggesting a more general resolution about persecution of religious minorities because “we have a number of instances of persecution of Christians arising in several contexts around the communion.”The Pakistan resolution drew the most discussion among the six that the council considered on Nov. 3. It passed five ecumenism-related resolutions. They include:Resolution 15.13 which welcomes “To Love and Serve the Lord,” a report of the Anglican-Lutheran International Commission; commends it to the communion’s churches for study and action; endorses the study’s recommendations and affirms the establishment of a coordinating committee to take the work forward.Resolution 15.14 which renews the Anglican-Old Catholic International Coordinating Council and commends “Belonging together in Europe: A joint statement on aspects of ecclesiology and mission” as the basis on which to move to a concrete proposal for common mission.Resolution 15.15, which recommends establishment of a dialogue with the World Communion of Reformed Churches.Resolution 15.16, which affirms a report on transitivity (the question of the relationship of different ecumenical agreements to one another) in ecumenical relations and commends it to the communion’s churches, inviting them to implement its recommendations where appropriate.Resolution 15.17, which welcomes “The Church: Towards a Common Vision” from the World Council of Churches, commends it for study and asks WCC members to send their response to both the WCC and the Anglican Communion Office.The ACC will not meet on Nov. 4 (local time) so that members can worship with Anglicans in Auckland and other parts of the province, and learn about their mission and ministry. The members will discuss their so-called “Mission Encounters” when they return to Holy Trinity Cathedral (http://www.holy-trinity.org.nz/) on Nov. 5.ACC backgroundThe ACC is one of the four instruments of communion, the others being the archbishop of Canterbury (who serves as president of the ACC), the Lambeth Conference of Anglican bishops, and the Primates Meeting.Formed in 1969, the ACC includes clergy and lay people, as well as bishops, among its delegates. The membership includes from one to three persons from each of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, depending on the numerical size of each province. Where there are three members, there is a bishop, a priest and a lay person. Where fewer members are appointed, preference is given to lay membership. The ACC’s constitution is here.The council meets every three years or four years and the Auckland meeting is the council’s 15th since it was created.The Episcopal Church is represented by Josephine Hicks of North Carolina; the Rev. Gay Jennings of Ohio; and Bishop Ian Douglas of Connecticut.Jefferts Schori is attending the meeting in her role as a member of the Anglican Communion Standing Committee, which met here prior to the start of the ACC meeting. Douglas is also a member of the Standing Committee.A complete list of the ACC15 participants is here.All ENS coverage of ACC15 is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Consultative Council Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 3, 2012 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Consultative Council ready to stand by religious minorities Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israellast_img read more

Episcopal missionaries nurture global partnerships, deepen Communion

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal missionaries nurture global partnerships, deepen Communion Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missionaries, Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Anglican Communion, [Episcopal News Service] As The Episcopal Church prepares to observe World Mission Sunday on Feb. 15, the following article looks at some of the treasures of its missionary program. The purpose of World Mission Sunday is to focus on the global impact of the Baptismal Covenant’s call to “seek and serve Christ in all persons” (Book of Common Prayer, p. 305), and to raise awareness of the many ways in which The Episcopal Church participates in God’s mission around the world. The recently released Report to the Church details the work of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society in coordinating and supporting Episcopal Church missionaries serving throughout the world.Natalie Finstad, an Episcopal Church missionary who served in Kenya, helps to plant seedlings at a young adult leadership event with one of Tatua Kenya’s partner organizations, the Nyumba ya Tumaini Children’s Home in Nairobi. Photo: Tatua KenyaSeveral years of serving as an Episcopal Church missionary taught Natalie Finstad that healing and change only really happen in the context of community and that “we cannot begin to recognize who we are in God without the presence of community.”Relationships with one another “invite us into a deeper understanding of who we are,” she told ENS shortly after she’d returned to the U.S. after four years living in Kenya, where she established the Tatua Kenya program to develop leaders and community organizers in East Africa to become agents of change.And for Finstad, 30, being a missionary is all about deepening partnerships, “being in right relationships … building up the Kingdom of God.”Finstad is one of thousands of Episcopal missionaries who over several decades have chosen to embrace a life-changing experience of walking alongside a community often far removed – both geographically and culturally – from their own.Although she has left Kenya, her missionary work lives on through Tatua Kenya, which is now managed locally by community leaders who are committed to a sustainable future.Crossing cultural boundaries, building partnerships, and engaging God’s mission locally and globally are at the very heart of The Episcopal Church’s missionary program, which “offers individuals an opportunity to be agents of Jesus in the world. Then through our telling of the stories, it offers other people an opportunity to see how they can be engaged,” Finstad said.“We need opportunities to get involved. The program opened avenues for me to tell the story … and to build beautiful relationships,” she added. “I can’t even say who I am without this experience in Kenya. I could not even begin to separate myself from what I’ve learned there. The rest of my life will be a display of gratitude for that experience – I am confident of that.”The Rev. David Copley, mission personnel officer for the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, says it is difficult “to quantify the success of our missionaries because the basic premise is always to strengthen relationships with our partners.” But, he added, some of the greatest success stories can be found “in the programs that continue when the missionary presence ends.”Episcopal Church missionary Natalie Finstad attends the launch of a campaign to get kids back to school in Kenya. Photo: Tatua KenyaThrough Tatua Kenya, for example, Finstad seized the opportunity to build effective and sustainable solutions to poverty in Kenya by developing local leadership and encouraging community participation, rather than simply turning to overseas sources of funding. The project now offers a two-year fellowship for local leaders to learn community organizing skills and use those skills to launch locally run initiatives that improve livelihoods and reduce dependency within their communities.“We rarely see missionaries as being in a long-term placement for their whole career,” Copley said, acknowledging the importance of programs that empower the local community. “This can be seen also with the ministry of the Rev. Zach Drennen, who began with a program to have scholarships for high school students in Kenya with funding mostly from the U.S. His program now receives 50 percent of its funds from local sources and he is looking to hire a new local director for the program and to transition out of his role there.”The Episcopal Church’s missionary program, which is administered by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, currently sponsors and supports 47 adult missionaries who serve in various roles, such as doctors, nurses, teachers, accountants, agriculturalists, computer technicians, administrators, theologians, and communicators.Missionaries are lay and ordained, young and old, and serve as “representatives of our community who cross cultural boundaries to participate in the mission of God that our brothers and sisters in other parts of the Anglican Communion feel called to respond to,” says Copley.Over the past two years, the church’s Young Adult Service Corps program has taken on a new lease of life, with 45 missionaries aged 21-30 serving in a broad diversity of roles and contexts.The 2013-2015 budget passed by General Convention allotted $1 million to make “a missionary experience available to all Episcopal young people through such programs as the Young Adult Service Corps program for a gap year experience between high school and college or work.”That allocation is part of the way in which the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is responding to the third Mark of Mission, which calls on members of the Anglican Communion to respond to human need in loving service.The recently released Report to the Church details the budget-supported work of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society to date in the current triennium, including the Mark Three work on pages 44-55.Convention structured the current triennial budget around the Communion’s Five Marks of Mission and provided significant unallocated sums for new work targeted around each Mark of Mission. The intention was that the resulting work would be done in new, collaborative partnerships with dioceses, congregations and other Episcopal organizations. The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society has provided seed money and/or matching grants as well as staff support and expertise for the new work.The 2013 group of 28 missionaries was the largest number of YASC volunteers ever, including three returnees and two representing the church’s Province IX (dioceses in the Caribbean, Central and South America) for the first time in the program.For the upcoming year, a record-breaking 42 young adults representing 25 dioceses, one quarter of whom are people of color, have filed applications to serve in the program.Will Bryant, Young Adult Service Corps missionary from the Episcopal Diocese of Western North Carolina, poses for a photo with a seafarer and friend during his year in service with the Mission to Seafarers in Hong Kong.“When I first signed up to do YASC, I had no idea how much it would change my life,” said Will Bryant from the Diocese of Western North Carolina, who spent his first year as a YASC missionary working with the Mission to Seafarers in Hong Kong, and is currently serving a second year at the Joel Nafuma Refugee Centre in Rome.“In my two years with the program I have grown spiritually and mentally in ways that I would have never imagined,” he told ENS.Bryant said that his experiences with the YASC program have helped him to realize that “whether you are an Afghani refugee, a Filipino seafarer or an American missionary, we are all seeking the same thing: a safe, comfortable place to call home, employment to provide for our families and community, and a deeper connection with our creator. … Now, after living in two completely different countries and continents, I can safely say that I have become more confident in my faith and in my abilities as a human being. I don’t exactly know what the future holds after my time in YASC, but I do know that whatever that may be, I will be well-prepared because of the lessons I have learned as a missionary.”Through the missionary program, several relationships with other Anglican provinces have continued to deepen and flourish.The partnership between The Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, for example, goes back several decades. Long-term adult missionary Jenny McConnachie has devoted her life to the poorest of the poor. She and her late husband Chris moved from North Carolina to South Africa’s Eastern Cape in the early 1980s. Together, they set up African Medical Mission, strengthening the most vulnerable communities through their commitment and compassionate service.Over the past decade that partnership has seen several YASCers heading to South Africa to serve in educational, healthcare, community development and administrative roles.Copley received a letter from Archbishop of Cape Town Thabo Makgoba saying how much the YASC program benefits the Anglican Church of Southern Africa “and how he sees the young adults growing in their ministry, highlighting the mutuality of mission.”Makgoba, speaking with Episcopal News Service, said that the young adult missionaries are “all characterized by one key value: they are selfless in their giving of their energy and expertise. They show the critical value of Ubuntu,” a Zulu/Xhosa word that describes human identity as being formed through community and encompassing a sense of caring, sharing and being in harmony with all of creation.“My prayer is that this partnership should grow from strength to strength,” Makgoba added. “I hope that those who come to South Africa are so touched by South Africa that they take a part of our humanity. This is an invaluable program as part and parcel of our mission and ministry in Southern Africa. As Christians we need to strive to be anchored in the love of Christ and committed to His mission and ministry and transform societies so that they reflect the love of Christ and they too can be empowered to make Christ known in their own contexts.”Copley said that the Episcopal Church in the Philippines, which began receiving YASCers in 2012, has also acknowledged the benefits of their presence and has expressed its commitment to continuing the partnership.Carlin van Schaik of the Diocese of Northwest Texas is currently in her second year in YASC serving with the Episcopal Church in the Philippines. Her 2013-14 YASC year was spent in Seoul with the Anglican Church’s Towards Peace in Korea program, which focuses on humanitarian aid and peace education.Episcopal Church missionary Natalie Finstad sits and talks with some boys who live at the Nyumba ya Tumaini Children’s Home, one of Tatua Kenya’s partner organizations, in Nairobi. Photo: Tatua KenyaSpeaking with ENS just a few months after arriving in South Korea, van Schaik said that the experience had already “widened her world view. I had no idea how American I was until I arrived. I listen a lot more than I used to, and I have a much better sense of the interconnectedness of people. … That’s made a really big difference on how I view the world and consider my own actions now. I want to be able to live much more globally and much less locally than I have before.”The YASC program is “a chance for you to learn more about yourself, do good work, meet new people, and you don’t have to pay your student loans for a year,” she added. “You keep changing your whole life so the YASC program is a good place to start practicing that. It’s been really educational.”Copley highlighted a new initiative currently being offered by the mission personnel office to support shorter-term missionaries who can provide specific skills.For instance, Jim and Mary Higbee and Sue Dauer visited Kenya for just one month in 2014 to provide hands-on teacher training which they will continue to follow up with in the coming years.Copley’s office also continues to work with Episcopal Church dioceses to strengthen their companion relationships and to support medium-term mission placements of older adults as well as for YASCers.“I see mission service as providing technical expertise to empower others and also an avenue to strengthen companion relationships through the ministry of presence,” he said.Jenny Korwan, who served as a YASC missionary from 2012-13 working with Finstad at Tatua Kenya, says she will always consider herself an Episcopal Church missionary. “Society and culture tell you what missionary is, but the mission of the church is really based on relationship and sharing the love of Christ and the love of God through what we do and how we act. Uniting churches and uniting the faith community across cultures is a huge part of what being a missionary is all about.”For Finstad, who is currently in the discernment process in the Diocese of Massachusetts, her personal faith has always motivated her work, which she said is primarily about building relationships and working towards reconciliation.But her ministry in Kenya has changed the way she views mission.“I used to think of mission as something we do or accomplish, but now I am much more concerned with mission being about healing” and relationships.“It is not our responsibility to heal the world – that is the work of God,” she added. “However, it is our mandate to honor God’s presence in all of creation and to cultivate a mature understanding of what it means to be a child of God. We must invite all our brothers and sisters to join us … in envisioning how we could work towards the Kingdom of God together.”For further information about the missionary program, contact the Rev. David Copley, director for mission personnel, at [email protected] For further information about the YASC program, contact Elizabeth Boe, officer for global networking, at [email protected] video stories highlighting the ministry of YASC missionaries are available below.One young adult…and a Roman refugee centerOne young adult…and a South African clinicOne young adult…and a provincial archivesOne young adult…and a mission for migrant workersOne young adult…and a mission to seafarers — Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Youth & Young Adults Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Young Adult Service Corps, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Report to the Church 2015, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA By Matthew DaviesPosted Feb 12, 2015 Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Climate change brings food insecurity to Bangladesh’s Garo community

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Advocacy Peace & Justice, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglican Communion, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Poverty & Hunger In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Climate change brings food insecurity to Bangladesh’s Garo community Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Environment & Climate Change, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Posted Aug 2, 2016 Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Asia, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

Pour 400 épiscopaliens-anglicans et plus : l’évangélisation compte dans le…

first_img Evangelism Matters 2016 Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT [Episcopal News Service – Dallas (Texas)] Le slogan que l’on pouvait lire sur le sac promotionnel : « Évangéliste épiscopal, ce n’est pas antinomique ».Certains pourraient penser qu’un évangéliste épiscopal est une espèce rare mais plus de 400 évangélistes chevronnés et débutants ont passé les 18 et 19 novembre à s’inspirer amicalement et à découvrir de nouvelles manières de vivre à la hauteur de ce slogan, pendant la conférence « Evangelism Matters » [L’évangélisation compte], ici à l’église de la Transfiguration.La révérende Emily Schnabl, recteure de St. Christopher’s Episcopal Church, de Midwest City (État d’Oklahoma), confie qu’elle était déjà convaincue du besoin d’évangélisation et qu’elle est venue à la conférence pour rechercher des moyens pratiques de donner vie à cette idée dans sa paroisse. Elle déclare à Episcopal News Service qu’elle est repartie avec le sentiment d’avoir trouvé de l’aide dans certaines choses que St. Christopher fait déjà et d’autres « choses tout à fait réalisables que j’ai littéralement dans mon sac, à emporter avec moi ».L’Église épiscopale s’éveille au besoin d’évangéliser, explique Ron Braman, membre à part entière de la tribu Eastern Shoshone du Wyoming et responsable du ministère de la musique à la mission épiscopale Good Shepherd de Fort Hall (État de l’Idaho). Ron Braman s’est dit encouragé par la présence d’évangélistes laïcs car trop de gens partent du principe que ce travail ne peut être effectué que par le clergé. Cette attente est autodestructrice, dit-il, « car si nous n’accomplissons pas notre part du travail, nous vouons nos leaders à l’échec ».Lutter contre cette perception antinomique commence au niveau des individus eux-mêmes, déclare au cours de la séance plénière du 19 novembre, la révérende Stephanie Spellers, chanoine de l’Évêque Primat pour l’évangélisation et la réconciliation, en posant la question : « Pourquoi avons-nous besoin d’une conférence pour nous convaincre nous-mêmes ou proclamer que l’évangélisation compte ? »« Je pense que vous savez pourquoi », répond-elle. « Je pense que nous savons, en notre for intérieur, que nous avons été ambivalents », à propos du terme même d’« évangélisation », sans parler d’être des évangélistes.Lorsqu’elle a demandé aux participants de dire à haute voix pourquoi c’est ainsi, voici certaines des réponses qu’elle a obtenues : « crainte du rejet », « crainte de paraître ringard », « méfaits par le passé, au nom de l’évangélisation », « laissons ça au clergé », les « gens doivent être doués pour faire de l’évangélisation » et « je ne suis pas sûr… qu’est-ce que la Bonne Nouvelle ? ».La conférence intitulée « l’évangélisation compte », qui a rapidement vendu la totalité de ses 400 places et a décidé d’en ajouter 14, a été co-organisée par Forward Movement et le bureau de l’Évêque Primat. Elle a été accueillie par le Diocèse de Dallas et l’église de la Transfiguration.L’Évêque Primat Michael Curry, lors de son discours d’ouverture puis à nouveau durant son sermon, le 18 novembre, a fixé un ordre du jour ambitieux, lancé un vibrant appel à l’action et expliqué ce qu’est et n’est pas l’évangélisation épiscopale.« Jésus n’est pas mort sur la croix pour que l’église soit plus grande », a expliqué Michael Curry durant son discours, ajoutant que, de la même façon, l’évangélisation n’a rien à voir avec une église plus grande, elle a à voir avec un monde meilleur.Elle n’a rien à voir non plus avec l’impérialisme culturel ou religieux, poursuit l’Évêque Primat. « Il ne s’agit pas de conquérir le monde pour le Christ », a-t-il expliqué au cours de son sermon. « Il s’agit de saturer le monde d’amour ».Peut-être, a suggéré Michael Curry, que l’Église épiscopale est censée dire au monde que le fondement du christianisme est l’amour manifesté en Jésus Christ.Article complet en anglais. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release de Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 21, 2016 Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET center_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Pour 400 épiscopaliens-anglicans et plus : l’évangélisation compte dans le monde Une conférence qui réunit, inspire et donne des outils pratiques Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Evangelism, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

Anglican Evensong celebrated in Vatican’s St. Peter’s Basilica

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. John Cochrane says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican Communion, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI [Anglican Communion News Service] Another milestone in relations between Canterbury and Rome took place in the Vatican on Monday as a traditional Anglican Choral Evensong was celebrated for the first time in St. Peter’s Basilica.Anglican and Catholic bishops and clergy – including one female chaplain, Rev Dana English from the Anglican Church of All Saints Rome – gathered together at the altar below Bernini’s great bronze sculpture encasing the relics of the Chair of St. Peter.Full article. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Father Mike Waverly-Shank says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Anglican Evensong celebrated in Vatican’s St. Peter’s Basilica Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments (2) Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags March 14, 2017 at 7:16 pm How do I access this Service of Evensong? I would enjoy listening to it. Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Posted Mar 14, 2017 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release March 15, 2017 at 10:53 am Praise God for this!! Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Albany, NY Ecumenical & Interreligious Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA last_img read more